Philippine Travels

Traveling, for most people, is a social activity. We travel with family and friends. We travel with colleagues from the office, or even with acquaintances with whom we have the same interests. There are times, however, when nobody in our circle shares our thirst for travel. In such cases, we can either travel alone or don’t travel at all. For the real travel-bugs, the second is not an option at all. A lot of people travel by themselves for this reason. Rather than endure the company of strangers in tour groups, for example, solo travelers prefer to make it on their own, loving the freedom of making choices and changing them, of going to a place and leaving early or staying late, and especially of getting to know and chatting up with people one would not normally talk to if one were not alone. The Philippines is one of those places which welcome and is generally hospitable to solitary travelers. There are a lot of destinations in the country that are conducive for solo travels, maximizing the traveler’s experience of a different culture. The locals are generally friendly to foreigners, and there are many man-made and natural attractions that are not usually frequented by tourists.

Located in Northern Luzon, these two provinces are flocked by travelers who are after captivating ocean views, old churches, World Heritage sites and glorious natural attractions. Its offer of delectable vegetable cuisines such as pinakbet, local delicacies like bagnet and the famous empanadang Vigan has also made it a favorite destination for food enthusiasts. Depending on one’s schedule, these two provinces can be combined in a single trip as they are only 2.5 hours away from each other by public transport. The fastest way is to take a plane from Manila to Laoag. From there, the 45-meter Sinking Bell Tower is easily accessible. Nearby also is the St. William Church built in the Spanish era, one of the largest churches in the Philippines. Vigan, the capital of Ilocos Sur, can be easily reached from Laoag. It is well-known for Calle Crisologo (Crisologo Street), a UNESCO World Heritage site. Calle Crisologo is a half-kilometer street lined up with houses showcasing architecture dating from the era of Spanish colonization. Numerous souvenir shops filled with local crafts also line the area. For a more enjoyable experience, walk around street or hire a calesa, a horse-drawn carriage, to go around town